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Tutorials

Neutrons in Biology

Sunday, July 10
12:45-6:30 p.m.
 
Promenade (Stern) Deck Level, Queens Salon  

The aim of the tutorial session is to highlight the main neutron scattering and computational techniques used to study biological and biologically relevant systems. Talks will contain 20 minutes of introductory material and 40 minutes of practical analyses. Topics will include: Protein SANS; Membrane Neutron Reflectometry; Membrane Inelastic Scattering (NSE and Backscattering); Protein Crystallography; and Protein/Membrane Simulations.

12:45 p.m.—Welcome
John Katsaras, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-2 p.m.—Protein SANS
Christopher B. Stanley, Biology and Soft Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2–3 p.m.—Membrane Neutron Reflectometry
Rana Ashkar
, Biology and Soft Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

3-3:15 p.m.—BREAK

3:15-4:15 p.m.—Membrane Inelastic Scattering (NSE and Backscattering)
Jonathan D. Nickels
, Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4:15-5:15 p.m.—Protein Crystallography
Matthew J. Cuneo,
Biology and Soft Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5:15-5:30 p.m.—BREAK

5:30-6:30 p.m.—Protein/Membrane Simulations
Xiaolin Cheng
, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Discovering Diffuse Scattering Signatures—Means to Measure, Process Data and Pathways to Analyzing It

Sunday, July 10
1-6 p.m.
 
Promenade (Stern) Deck Level, Royal Salon 

Structurally ordered, functional materials owe their macroscopic properties to the intricate interplay microscopic local arrangements of atomic or magnetic nature. Structure relationships in systems of correlated disorder, with long-range ordered structure governing a short-range local arrangement; have been observed for magnetic or structural frustrated systems. Neutron single crystal diffraction is a particularly sensitive tool to measure the elastic, ordered scattering contribution and the (in)elastic disordered contribution congruently. Particularly useful for surveying contiguous volumes of scattering or Q-space is the time-of-flight Laue method as a broad range of incident energies is recorded with high resolution, which can directly be converted into a volume of Q-space for visualization and further analysis.

In this tutorial, we will cover the setup and data collection for reciprocal space survey, application of incident energy and sample dependent correction in Q-space, for scattering data with and without inelastic discrimination. Visualization in reciprocal space is the first qualitative analysis step to gain preliminary information on shape, direction and extend of the diffuse contribution. Examples using the Mantid program suite for data processing and visualization with example data will be shown. Pathways for analysis will be entertained.

1 p.m.—Welcome
Thomas Proffen, Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1:10–1:45 p.m.—Disordered Materials and Diffuse Scattering Analysis—A 20 Year Perspective
Thomas Proffen, Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1:45–2:20 p.m.—New Science in Disordered Quantum Materials
Alan Tennant, Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2:20–2:55 p.m.—Crystallography Beyond Bragg Peaks
Arkadiy Simonov, Organic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford

2:55–3:25 p.m.—BREAK 

3:25–4 p.m.—One Essential Lesson for Measuring Diffuse Neutron Scattering
Andrei Savici, Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4–4:35 p.m.—Modeling Disorder Using Discus
Ross Whitfield, Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4:35–5:10 p.m.—Diffuse Scattering and Supercomputing
Vickie Lynch, Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5:10–5:30 p.m.—Exploring Local Structure in 3-D Reciprocal Space using Wave-Length Resolved Neutron Data
Christina Hoffmann, Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5:30–6 p.m.—The Current Status and Opportunities of Diffuse Scattering Analysis–Discussion
Garrett Granroth, Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Sponsors

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