Plenary Speakers

Hidekazu TsuchidaHidekazu Tsuchida
Advancing 4H-SiC Crystal Technology to the Next Stage

Monday, September 18
8:45 am – 9:30 am
Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Hidekazu Tsuchida joined the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in 1992, and is currently the deputy associate vice president and electronic materials sector leader in the Materials Science Research Laboratory. In 1994, he began research on epitaxial growth and defect control of SiC to realize next-generation power devices for high-voltage power transmission and distribution. His current research topics include high-throughput large-diameter epitaxial growth, fast bulk crystal growth and control of point and extended defects for SiC power devices. Since 2016, Tsuchida has served as chair of the Advanced Power Semiconductors Division of the Japan Society of Applied Physics.

Anup BhallaAnup Bhalla
Recent Developments Accelerating SiC Adoption

Monday, September 18
9:30 am – 10:15 am
Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Anup Bhalla, vice president of engineering at United Silicon Carbide, Inc., received his PhD degree in electronic engineering from Rensselaer in 1995. His graduate research focused on the development of high-voltage emitter switched thyristors. He received his MS degree from Rensselaer in 1991 and BTech degree from the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi in 1989, both in electrical engineering. He is the primary or co-inventor on over 100 patents covering semiconductor device structures, processing and packaging techniques in the area of power semiconductors. As vice president of engineering at United Silicon Carbide, Inc., Bhalla oversees the development of silicon carbide discrete devices and power integrated circuits. He brings over 15 years of experience from the silicon power device industry to enable the company to transition silicon carbide products into high-volume production using a highly scalable foundry model. Before joining United Silicon Carbide, Inc. in 2012, Bhalla was vice president of the high-voltage MOSFET product line at Alpha and Omega Semiconductor, a company he co-founded in 2000, and is now a $360M enterprise. Between 2007 and 2010, he was vice president of discrete device development at Alpha and Omega Semiconductor, where he led the development of low-, medium- and high-voltage MOSFETs, superjunction MOSFETs, IGBTs and fast-recovery diodes. Prior to that, he held engineering positions at Vishay Siliconix working on power MOSFETs, and Harris Semiconductor, working on 600–1200V IGBTs.