Publications & News

2016 Issues

Materials360 Newsletter Archives 

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  • December 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 24)

    The second December issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features an update on the burgeoning field of perovskites and a materials view of the 2016 Nobel prizes on the use of topological concepts. Also included is the status of cleanup technologies following the Fukushima tragedy, and the effect of “Brexit” on the materials research community in the UK. 

  • December 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 23)

    The first December issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features developments on a nanostructured interlayer that prevents capacity loss in Li-S batteries, and news coverage of a multi-society report proposing long-term solutions regarding access to helium. Also included is the MRS Bulletin video-recorded interview with Nancy Stoffel of GE on materials and innovation.

  • November 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 22)

    The second November issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features “CRISPR: implications for materials research.” Also included is the MRS Bulletin video addressing the question: How does impact factor govern what journals choose to publish?  

  • November 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 21)

    The first November issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features developments on 3D-printed bones, room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroics, and NV-based sensors. Also included are featured activities and events scheduled for the 2017 MRS Fall Meeting.
  • October 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 20)

    The second October issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features challenges that LIGO optical coatings present in materials research, and opportunities the Nobel prizes for topology offer in advancing materials science. Also included is the MRS Bulletin video-recorded interview with Stephen Forrest (University of Michigan)—an MRS Medalist and entrepreneur—on materials innovation.

  • October 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 19)

    The first October issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features a real-time 3D look inside a battery, the functionalities of an atomic-scale inorganic double helix, and the use of electricity to extract antimony from its ores. Also included is the release of an MRS/APS/ACS report on retaining accessibility of helium for research, and coverage of an MRS-developed materials course team-taught by professors in the sciences and the humanities. 

  • September 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 18)

    The second September issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features recent developments in biomaterials to enhance ultrasound imaging, scanning microscopy that capture ionic movements in a material, and mesocrystal-embedded functional oxide systems make it possible to tune properties of new nanocomposites. Also included is the launch of a video series of interviews conducted by MRS Bulletin, beginning with Editorial Board Chair Fiona Meldrum of the University of Leeds.

  • September 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 17)

    The first September issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features and update on the burgeoning field of perovskites and coverage on how geometric lattice engineering can be used to build new topological materials. Also included is the status of the Li-ion battery industry.

  • August 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 16)

    This issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features recent developments in triggered self-destruction Li-ion batteries, a 3D printing-based method that enables scaling up of elastic metallic nanostructures, and nanodiamond anvils to study materials at ultrahigh pressures. Also included is news about “Innovate UK,” government policy that mixes materials-specific programs with general support for industry sectors.

  • August 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 15)

    The first August issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features recent development in gravity-induced flow cell batteries, broadband plasmonic absorbers, and 3D printing of micro-patterned ion exchange polymeric membranes leading to a new method in manufacturing. Also included is an announcement of a UK science exhibit on graphene as a “Wonder Material.”
  • July 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 14)

    The second July issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features news highlights on an epoxy resin liquid crystal network that displays three-way shape memory behavior that can be triggered by heat or light; coated membranes with nanometer-sized cracks that act as ion/water selective nanovalves, thus regulating water loss; and mechanochromic devices that reversibly change color, pattern, and transparency. Also included is an article scoping out competitions that incentivize materials innovation.

  • July 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 13)

    The first July issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features recent highlights on perovskite research as well as research on a device that serves like an internal ECG. Also included is an exploration of the role of rare earth elements in the future development of lighting and displays
  • June 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 12)

    The second June issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features an assortment of articles on materials and energy, including research that identifies where pervoskites are losing their efficiency, and a push to recycle Li batteries. Also included is news on scientists’ response to the UK vote to leave the European Union.
  • June 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 11)

    The first June issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features recent research on how researchers mimic the process of biomineralization in the lab, create a stable single-atom magnet, and encapsulate blood samples in silk protein to protect blood biomarkers without refrigeration. Also included is an announcement of the 2016 Kavli Prize in Nanoscience.
  • May 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 10)

    The second May issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features an article showing that much that is being done to combat global warming is actually contributing to it. Also included is a six-part series video by NBC Learning/National Science Foundation on nanotechnology featuring research by Dawn Bonnell, Paul Alivisatos, and Paula Hammond among others.
  • May 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 9)

    The first May issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features recent research on graphene nanoribbons taken one step closer to transforming graphene into a semiconductor, metal-organic frameworks efficiently removing oxygen from air at room temperature, and a plasma oxidation technique that enables precise control over mixed metal oxide composition. Also included is a video explanation of the research reported in an award-winning article published in the Journal of Materials Research.
  • April 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 8)

    The second April issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features news on two methods to grow uniform MoS2 film on the large-scale; printable composite ink, based on graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets, and how ion storage impacts the mechanical properties of MXene. Also included are the winners of the Innovation in Materials Science program presented at the 2016 MRS Spring Meeting and a call for proposals for a student-organized event at the 2016 MRS Fall Meeting.
  • April 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 7)

    The first April issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features recent research on developing methods to build complex structures in nanophotonics, producing highly structured metal foams by ice-templating, and utilizing a passivation technique to lead to next-generation high-efficiency photovoltaics. Also included is a video explaining conjugated polymers applied in biomedicine, the topic of David Martin’s inaugural MRS Communications Lecture delivered at the 2016 MRS Spring Meeting in Phoenix, Ariz.
  • March 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 6)

    The second March issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features news on a minimally-invasive stent-electrode recording array, on the potential use of H2O2 to replace more hazardous materials used in bleach and disinfectants, and medical implants designed to dissolve in the body. Also included are Corporate Partner news and Goodyear’s vision for a tire to go with autonomous vehicles.
  • March 2016 (Volume 16, Issue 5)

    The first March issue of the Materials 360 Newsletter features recent research on an inorganic-organic hybrid semiconductor that shows high reflectivity, and silk protein processing that has been used to create a cortical brain tissue model. Also included are highlights for the upcoming 2016 Materials Research Society Spring Meeting in Phoenix, Ariz.