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MRS in the News—2014 Archives

MRS in the News is a collection of media coverage about MRS meetings, publications, membership, events and more. Read on to learn more about the exciting things happening around MRS. Visit MRS in the News for the most current news articles. For MRS press releases, visit the MRS Press Room.

MRS Fall 2014

NanoTechWeb.org | December 19, 2014

A behemoth of a conference, the MRS Fall Meeting can provide a great one-stop shop for getting an ear to the ground on developments in materials science. But navigating the 3,300 plus oral presentations, nearly 3,000 poster presentations and vast exhibition hall can be daunting. We pick out some of the highlights from the 2014 MRS Fall Meeting.


Chen receives award from Materials Research Society

Penn State News | December 9, 2014

Long-Qing Chen, Distinguished Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Science and Mechanics, and Mathematics, received the Materials Research Society’s (MRS) Materials Theory Award at the 2014 MRS Fall Meeting Awards Ceremony held Nov. 30 to Dec. 5 in Boston.


Researchers looking to 4-D printing to create biosensors from edible gels

Phys.org | December 8, 2014

A team of researchers working at the University of Wollongong in Australia has received the go-ahead for a seven year study with the goal of looking at the possibility of using additive manufacturing techniques to develop biosensors made from edible gels. Team lead Marc in het Panhuis along with colleague Alex Keller recently gave a presentation to attendees at a Materials Research Society Symposium entitled "Printed Organic Electronic Device Components from Edible Materials." Their aim is to learn if it might be possible to use ordinary edible gels to create biosensors that when consumed, could provide physicians with data regarding the internal state of a patient.


Researchers at Northwestern University Develop Material to 3D Print Fuel Cells

3DPrint.com | December 8, 2014

The Shah Group Tissue Engineering and Additive Manufacturing (TEAM) lab, led by Dr. Ramille Shah, is working on new fuel cell designs that utilize 3D printing with ceramic materials. The designs the researchers are working on could lead to more efficient solid oxide fuel cells. The researchers, who include undergraduate and graduate students and PhD candidates at Northwestern University, have a particular focus in 3D printing materials and presented their progress at the 2014 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston.


Physicist Mildred Dresselhaus Receives Presidential Medal of Freedom

Product Design & Development | December 4, 2014

The Materials Research Society (MRS) congratulates Mildred Dresselhaus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on today's award of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor bestowed by the United States.


Marvin L. Cohen to Receive the Materials Research Society's Highest Honor

ChemEurope.com | October 29, 2014

The 2014 Von Hippel Award, the Materials Research Society’s (MRS) highest honor, will be presented to Marvin L. Cohen, University Professor of Physics at the University of California, Berkeley (UC–Berkeley) and senior scientist in the Materials Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Cohen is being recognized for “explaining and predicting properties of materials and for successfully predicting new materials using microscopic quantum theory.”


Rodney S. Ruoff Awarded 2014 David Turnbull Lectureship

Bloomberg Businessweek | October 21, 2014

Devoting his career to research in carbon-based nanostructures, Ruoff has made numerous fundamental breakthroughs in the chemistry and physics of carbon materials and has shaped the research and practical applications of these materials as they are known today.


Materials Research Society Announces Vice President and New Board Members for 2015

TMC News | October 16, 2014

The Materials Research Society (MRS) is proud to announce the Vice President and new Board members for 2015, elected by the Society's global membership of almost 16,000.


Blue LED pioneers win physics Nobel

Optics.org | October 7, 2014

Three of the key researchers behind the development of blue LEDs have won the 2014 Nobel prize for physics. Shuji Nakamura shares the award and SEK 8 million ($1.1 million) cash prize with Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano. In 1989, Amano and Akasaki actually reported the first GaN-based LED at a conference in Los Angeles, and an improved version at the Materials Research Society (MRS) meeting in Boston two years later.


UCSB Materials Professor Shuji Nakamura Wins Nobel Prize in Physics

The UC Santa Barbara Current | October 6, 2014

The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Shuji Nakamura, professor of materials and of electrical and computer engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The prize is for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes, which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources, and is shared with Isamu Akasaki of Meijo University and Nagoya University, Japan; and Hiroshi Amono of Nagoya University. Nakamura was the recipient of the MRS Medal in 1997.


Chen receives Materials Research Society's Materials Theory Award

Penn State News | September 5, 2014

Long-Qing Chen, distinguished professor of materials science and engineering, and engineering science and mechanics, has received the Materials Research Society's Materials Theory Award. He will receive his award during the 2014 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston.
  

Editorial

MSE Newsletter | September 1, 2014

MRS Vice President Oliver Kraft looks forward to 2015 and his term as MRS president. He highlights global MRS activities, including the MRS University Chapters program, Strange Matter Green Earth and materials for a sustainable future.
  

Subsidize Green Energy by Taxing Consumption of Electricity, Asserts Article from MRS Energy & Sustainability—A Review Journal

red Orbit | August 21, 2014

A tough taxation choice may be required to fund development of wind and solar energy, helping to unlock the huge potential of these sustainable energies. Renewables expert David Faiman makes the controversial case for an electricity consumption tax to break dependence on fossil fuels in his uncompromising paper, "Concerning the global-scale introduction of renewable energies: Technical and economic challenges," set to trigger debate about the costs and benefits of taxing electricity use.
  

Grad student’s illuminating research yields reward

USC News | August 6, 2014

Simin Mehrabani has created a reliable ultraviolet sensor that detects levels of UV radiation through various environmental conditions. The work was recently honored at the 2014 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco, where she and her team received a Graduate Student Silver Award for research.
  

Materials pushing solar

Nature Photonics | July 1, 2014

At the 2014 MRS Spring Meeting, Nam-Gyu Park of Sungkyunkwan University in Suwon, Korea, shared new results on his group’s perovskite solar cell, which is based on methylammonium lead iodide (MALI) and formamidinium lead iodide (FALI) and exhibits a high conversion efficiency. (Please note: A subscription to Nature Photonics is required to view the complete article.)
  

Perovskite Is the New Black in the Solar World

IEEE Spectrum | June 25, 2014

At the Materials Research Society Spring Meeting in April, materials scientist Yang Yang of the University of California, Los Angeles, revealed that his lab had made a 19.3-percent-efficient perovskite cell—good enough to rival some commercial crystalline silicon solar cells, which typically notch up 17 to 23 percent efficiency.
  

Materials for Bioelectronics: Organic Electronics Meets Biology

Nature | June 22, 2014

The structural similarity of organic semiconductors to biological compounds suggests the use of these materials in biomedical applications, as presented during the 2014 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco, yet their implementation is not straightforward. Research in this area is growing fast, thanks to the combined efforts of the multidisciplinary bioelectronics community. (Please note: A subscription to Nature is required to view the complete article.)
  

Ontario Science Centre leases its Strange Matter exhibition to Shanghai Science & Technology Museum

Digital Journal | June 11, 2014

The Ontario Science Centre is pleased to announce its travelling exhibition Strange Matter, developed in collaboration with the Materials Research Society, will open at the Shanghai Science & Technology Museum in late July. The 510-square-metre (5,500-square-foot) interactive exhibition explores the complex world of modern materials and provides a glimpse into what the future might reveal. This marks the first time that the Ontario Science Centre has leased an exhibition to China.
  

Nano orchard and other amazing nanotechnology images

 Nanowerk News | May 18, 2014

This installment of Nanowerk's collection of amazing images from nanotechnology labs around the world includes first- and second-place winners from the 2014 MRS Spring Meeting Science as Art competition.
  

The smallest lady bug in the world (as created by Audrey Forticaux)

Women in Nanoscience | May 14, 2014

Audrey Forticaux, a graduate student in the Jin Group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, won first place in the 2014 MRS Spring Meeting Science as Art competition. She showed that ZnO nanorods epitaxially grown on CuGaO2 nanoplates in aqueous solution not only nucleate preferentially on a CuGaO2 substrate, but could also nucleate into interesting forms and shapes - like a lady bug. The addition of color to the SEM image of ZnO nanorods brings to life the smallest "nano" lady bug in the world.
  

Perovskite Solar Cells Keep On Surging

Science | May 2, 2014

The hottest solar cell materials are on the march again. At the 2014 MRS Spring Meeting, three research groups reported besting the previous efficiency record in cheap, easy-to-make crystalline materials called perovskites. One group's cells turn just shy of 20% of incoming solar energy into electricity. That's up from 16.2% efficiency reported in February and 3.8% just 5 years ago. Few solar technologies have ever improved so much, and none has done it so fast. (Please note: A subscription to Science is required to view the complete article.)
  

QDs Up Display Color, Brightness with Less Power

Photonics Spectra  | May 1, 2014

Quantum dots offer marked advantages over fixed-spectrum conventional phosphor technologies because QDs are tunable, so they can be induced to emit at a very narrow wavelength. Improvements to the technology in recent years are also making them more attractive. For example, Dr. Geoffrey Supran of MIT and colleagues have increased the external quantum efficiency of electrically driven colloidal QD-LEDs from less than 0.01 percent to around 18 percent, as reported in the Materials Research Society’s MRS Bulletin.
  

BNL Senior Scientist Honored as Fellow of Materials Research Society

Azom.com | April 30, 2014

Senior Scientist Ralph James of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory has been named a Fellow of the Materials Research Society (MRS). James was honored during a special reception held during the annual MRS meeting in San Francisco on April 22.
  

Brookhaven Lab Scientist Ralph James is Named Materials Research Society Fellow

EIN News | April 29, 2014

Ralph James of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory has been named a Fellow of the Materials Research Society (MRS). James was selected in recognition of his outstanding experimental and theoretical contributions in materials research leading to the development of compound semiconductors and innovative field-portable instrumentation for detecting and imaging x-ray and gamma-ray radiation.
  

UK professor recognised for pioneering work on solar cells

Energy Harvesting Journal | April 28, 2014

Professor Henry Snaith has received the Materials Research Society's (MRS) prestigious Outstanding Young Investigator Award for his work on the development of perovskite-based solar cells. Snaith's technology recently achieved power conversion efficiencies of 17% and is set to revolutionise the Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) market, as well as utility applications.
  

2014-2015 Congressional Science and Engineering Fellows Announced

Novus Light Technologies Today | April 28, 2014

The Optical Society (OSA); SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics; and the Materials Research Society (MRS) announced their 2014-2015 Congressional Science and Engineering Fellows. Ariel Marshall, of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), will serve as the 2014-2015 Arthur H. Guenther Congressional Fellow co-sponsored by OSA and SPIE, and James O’Dea, of Cornell University, will serve as the OSA/MRS Congressional Fellow. Each will serve one-year terms working as special legislative assistants on the staffs of U.S. congressional offices or committees in Washington, D.C.
  

Oxford professor recognised by Materials Research Society for solar cell work

Solar Power Portal UK | April 25, 2014

Professor Henry Snaith has been awarded the Outstanding Young Investigator Award for his work with perovskite-based solar cells by the Materials Research Society. Professor Snaith said, “I am delighted to be held in such esteem by the Materials Research Society. It is a great honour to receive the award and recognition such as this really helps to raise the profile of the exciting developments we are making in solar technology which we believe will result in a transformational change across the world.”
  

Professor Henry Snaith to Receive Outstanding Young Investigator Award for the Development of Perovskite-based Solar Cells

AZOcleantech.com | April 24, 2014

 Professor Henry Snaith is to receive the Materials Research Society’s (MRS) prestigious Outstanding Young Investigator Award for his work on the development of perovskite-based solar cells. The award will be announced this evening (23rd April) at the 2014 MRS Spring Meeting's Awards Ceremony and Plenary Session held in San Francisco. Snaith, who is a Professor of physics at Oxford University, is pioneering a new generation of thin-film, low cost photovoltaic technology that can easily be integrated into the glass facades of buildings.
  

Rethink your gender attitudes

Nature Materials | April 22, 2014

Gender discrimination in science is considered utterly unacceptable almost everywhere. Most researchers, men and women alike, strive to be fair and self-reflective, and try to judge Ph.D. applicants and peers by their competence only. Some bigger society meetings are more careful in tackling gender issues. The Materials Research Society conferences, for example, routinely offer childcare grants and networking breakfasts for women — in addition to inviting a fair share of female speakers.
  

UO-produced video points students toward sustainable industry

Around the O | April 16, 2014

What is sustainability? Can it really work in the world of big industry? University of Oregon chemist Jim Hutchison tackles both the definition and its application in the production of metals in a newly produced educational video for the Materials Research Society. The almost 13-minute video "Sustainable Design" appears as an introductory web offering in the Educational Resources for Modern Light Metals program, a collaboration of the Alcoa Foundation, the Materials Research Society Foundation, the Metals Service Centers Institute and the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society.
  

PNNL Scientist Selected Fellow in the Materials Research Society

EIN News | April 11, 2014

A materials scientist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been elected to the rank of Fellow in the Materials Research Society. Jim De Yoreo was recognized for his "pioneering research in the field of bio-inspired materials science and engineering along with his distinguished leadership and service to the materials community." De Yoreo leads PNNL's research initiative focusing on materials synthesis and simulation. He is also an affiliate professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Washington.
  

Strain can alter materials' properties

MIT News Office | April 10, 2014

In the ongoing search for new materials for fuel cells, batteries, photovoltaics, separation membranes and electronic devices, one newer approach involves applying and managing stresses within known materials to give them dramatically different properties. Bilge Yildiz, who authored a recent MRS Bulletin paper describing work in this field, explains that "even though we are dealing with small amounts of strain... the effects can be exponential," in some cases improving key reaction rates by tenfold or more.
  

New field of "strain engineering" could open up areas of materials research

Phys.org | April 2, 2014

In the ongoing search for new materials for fuel cells, batteries, photovoltaics, separation membranes, and electronic devices, one newer approach involves applying and managing stresses within known materials to give them dramatically different properties. One of the pioneers of this approach, Bilge Yildiz, who authored a recent MRS Bulletin paper describing work in this field, explains that "even though we are dealing with small amounts of strain"—displacing atoms within a structure by only a few percent—"the effects can be exponential," in some cases improving key reaction rates by tenfold or more.
  

De Novo Graphene Symposium to be Organized by UC Riverside Professor

Azonano.com | April 1, 2014

Cengiz Ozkan, a professor of mechanical engineering, will be organizing “Symposium OO: De Novo Graphene,” part of the 2014 MRS Spring Meeting and Exhibit. De Novo Graphene is the sixth symposium Ozkan has organized for MRS, and will run for five days to highlight recent breakthroughs in the nucleation and growth mechanisms; electronic, electrochemical, mechanical and thermal properties; manufacturing challenges; characterization and modeling of graphene materials; hierarchical architectures of graphene incorporating tunability and mutability in design, and integration with organic and inorganic materials and devices.
  

Amity student honored as ‘Woman of Innovation’

Amity Observer | March 28, 2014

Amity Science Research Program student Eeman Abbasi was honored recently as a Woman of Innovation by the Connecticut Technology Council. Eeman was one of 59 women selected as Women of Innovation® for the tenth annual Women of Innovation® awards dinner March 27. Abbasi and two other Amity Science Research students assisted Deborah Day in co-authoring a manuscript and poster on “The Effectiveness of Multimedia and Activity-Based Supplemental Teaching Resources in Materials Science Education,” published through MRS Proceedings and presented at the 2012 MRS Spring Meeting.
  

IBM Researcher Named Materials Research Society Fellow

India West | March 20, 2014

The Materials Research Society has named 22 members to be honored as Fellows for 2014 at the group’s spring meeting April 21-25 in San Francisco. Among the 22 to be feted is Indian American researcher Supratik Guha, director of physical sciences at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York. Guha is being recognized “for fundamental contributions to the materials science of high-k dielectrics that enable current electronic devices and future device scaling."
  

Twitter list: who's saying what on materials science?

The Guardian | March 11, 2014

The Materials Research Society (MRS) is a global community of innovative materials researchers and its Twitter feed reflects this. It's full of links to fascinating articles, physics facts and quirky quotes and jokes, so well worth checking them out.

Materials Research Society Announces 2014 MRS Fellows

MFR Tech | March 7, 2014

The Materials Research Society (MRS) will recognize 22 members as Fellows of the Materials Research Society at the 2014 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco. This recognition honors MRS members who are notable for their distinguished accomplishments and their outstanding contributions to the advancement of materials research, worldwide.
  

Plastic Logic Co-Founder Joins Global Greats

Business Weekly | March 6, 2014

Henning Sirringhaus, a co-founder of Cambridge UK technology pioneer Plastic Logic, has received one of the greatest honours bestowed by peers in the world of materials science. He is one of 22 global greats to be named as a 2014 Fellow of the Materials Research Society in the U.S. and will receive the accolade at a ceremony in San Francisco in April.
  

Engineer honored for pioneering graphene research

Phys.org | February 20, 2014

Alexander A. Balandin, a professor of electrical engineering at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering, has been elected a fellow of the Materials Research Society (MRS). He is the first fellow from UC Riverside.
  

Materials Science Organization Focuses on Outreach, Education

UT Dallas New Center | February 6, 2014

Materials science students at the University of Texas at Dallas started a student chapter of the Materials Research Society. More than 100 students have joined. MRS outreach officer Luis Delmar, an MSE doctoral student, said exposing prospective students to materials science is a priority for him.
  

University of Tennessee professor named to National Academy of Engineering

Phys.org | February 6, 2014

George Pharr, Chancellor's Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Joint Faculty Scientist in the Materials Science and Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been named to the National Academy of Engineering. Pharr is a principal editor of the Journal of Materials Research, an MRS Fellow and a 2010 recipient of the MRS Innovation in Materials Characterization Award.
  

Polymers in Boston at the 2013 MRS Fall Meeting

Materials Views | January 31, 2014

From edible electronics to stem cell growth, soft robots to self-healing networks, polymer scientists at the 2013 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston brought another year of materials science research to a close with a bang.
  

Materials science org focuses on outreach, education

The Mercury | January 27, 2014

Erika Fuentes-Fernandez is part of the materials science and engineering program, or MSE, at the University of Texas at Dallas and is the web officer for the new student chapter of the Materials Research Society. The UTD chapter of MRS became an official organization this month. The national society encourages discussion on the potential of materials research and hosts two symposia each year for chapter members.
  

Alien monsters and other amazing nanotechnology images

Nanowerk News | January 25, 2014

Gallery highlighting first- and second-place images from the 2013 MRS Fall Meeting's popular Science as Art competition.
  

Sema Ermez wins Science as Art MRS award for her SEM desert landscape

Women in Nano Blog | January 23, 2014

Ms. Sema Ermez, a graduate student in the Gradecak Group at MIT, won a 'Science as Art' award at the 2013 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, with a SEM image entitled "Desert Landscape at the Microscale." The SEM image shows a GaAs substrate cleavage plane after nanowire growth exhibiting features that resemble cactus, bushes, rocks and sand surfaces that create a perfect landscape of a calm, windless desert.
  

Winter in Boston: the MRS Fall Meeting 2013

Materials Views | January 8, 2014

The 2013 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society (MRS) took place in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, from December 1–6. With 52 technical symposia, ten tutorials, four poster sessions, more than 250 exhibitors and close to 6,000 registered participants, it was one of the largest MRS Fall Meetings ever.
  

Microscopist Chemists

C&EN | January 6, 2014

TEM traditionally has not provided a way to examine materials while they are subjected to the kinds of conditions typically encountered in real-world applications. Judging by the recent bounty of journal papers on this topic, things are changing. Scientists gathered at last month’s Materials Research Society meeting in Boston to discuss the latest advances in TEM methods for analyzing technologically important materials under conditions that not long ago would have been nearly impossible.  

Oliver Kraft Is Elected President of the Materials Research Society

MSE Newsletter | January 1, 2014

For the first time during the 40 years of its existence, the renowned Materials Research Society (MRS) has elected a non-American as its president: The KIT materials researcher Professor Oliver Kraft will be vice president of the MRS in 2014 and MRS president in 2015.