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News & Publications

AIXTRON Receives Award of Outstanding Achievement for Global SSL Development

AIXTRON

AIXTRON SE, a worldwide provider of deposition equipment to the semiconductor industry, received the “Award of Outstanding Achievement for Global SSL Development” from the International SSL Alliance (ISA) in the context of this years’ China SSL.

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MXene Nanocomposites are Flexible, Conductive, and Hydrophilic

Materials Research Society Mxene 220

In 2011, Drexel University materials scientists discovered a new family of two-dimensional (2D) materials created by immersing MAX phase powders—layered hexagonal carbides and nitrides—in hydrofluoric acid, which yielded 2D transition metal carbides and carbon nitrides. They named the resulting materials MXenes—a hat tip to MAX phases (without A-element) and graphene, which has a similar strength and electrical conductivity. Unlike graphene, however, the MXenes featured new properties such as a hydrophilic surface, opening up new avenues of research and commercial development.

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DNA Molds Form Custom-Shaped Nanoparticles

Materials Research Society Bennington crop 220

Inorganic nanostructures with prescribed shapes are important for a wide variety of applications such as in nanoelectronics, photonics, and biosensing. But current techniques are limited and unable to produce such nanoparticles quickly and with sub-5 nm resolution. Now, researchers at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have devised a new, simple method to quickly cast nanoparticles with user-specified three-dimensional (3D) shapes using DNA molds fashioned by computer-aided design (CAD).

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Targeted drug delivery, again and again

Materials Research Society/MRS Bulletin Lukmaan 220

A major aim in biomaterials research is to develop improved strategies for delivering therapeutic drugs to injury- and disease-affected tissues in an efficient, effective, and safe manner. Now researchers have developed a way to use drug-carrying polymer strands (or drug payloads) that are introduced into the bloodstream in a relatively noninvasive manner, such as through intravenous injection.

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Long-Qing Chen Awarded 2014 Materials Theory Award

Materials Research SocietyLong Qing Chen 220

The Materials Research Society (MRS) has named Long-Qing Chen, The Pennsylvania State University, the recipient of its Materials Theory Award for his "pioneering work in the development of the phase-field method and its applications in the computational modeling of mesoscale structures and their dynamics in inhomogeneous materials."

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Materials researchers honored as Top Global Thinkers for 2014

Foreign Policy

Each year, Foreign Policy recognizes the top 100 Leading Global Thinkers. This year, materials researchers are among the innovators.

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Gradient microstructures alleviate pitfalls of nano-grained metals

Materials Research Society/MRS Bulletin Macdonald 220

A solution to the problem of tensile brittleness in metals restructured through grain refinement has been reported by K. Lu of Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science. Lu studied gradient microstructures in copper to resolve the problem of increased tensile brittleness that accompanies nano-grained metals. Gradient microstructures are categorized by a gradual increase in grain size, starting from nanoscale grains at the surface to a more coarse-grained microstructure near the center. The researchers were able to induce this unique type of microstructure by generating a strain gradient in a coarse-grained metal so as to cause increased deformation near the surface.

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Scalable New Method Yields Porous Three-Dimensional Macrostructures

Materials Research Societygraphene assembly 220

Two researchers from Kyoto University’s Institute for Integrated Cell-Materials Sciences have proposed a versatile new method that allows them to construct porous, three-dimensional graphene oxide macrostructures in a simple, versatile, and scalable way.

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Dynamic Duo Receive MRS Medals for Bionic Self-assembled Nanoparticles

Materials Research Societydynamic duo 220

By leveraging the traits of a biological material and an inorganic material, Sharon C. Glotzer and Nicholas A. Kotov of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, along with their research colleagues, observed the spontaneous formation of “supraparticles,” just as they had predicted. They achieved a bionic structure that can do more than each material alone.

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Novel Sodium-Conducting Material Could Improve Rechargeable Batteries

National Institute of Standards and Technology Nist batteries 220

Rechargeable battery manufacturers may get a jolt from research performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and several other institutions, where a team of researchers has discovered a safe, inexpensive, sodium-conducting material that significantly outperforms others in its class.

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3D-printed robots are powered by skeletal muscle

Materials Research Society/MRS Bulletin (Hamer) 220

Recent advances in tissue engineering have allowed the construction of biologically inspired robots from soft tissues instead of hard materials, creating highly responsive machines that more closely mimic actual biological functions like locomotion.

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Brazil’s 'Green Silicon' to Undergo Feasibility Study

Solar Cluster Baden-Württemberg e.V.; Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research Baden-Württemberg (ZSW) solar cluster 220

The Brazilian state of Paraná is to get a photovoltaics manufacturing plant of its own with an annual capacity of 680 megawatts. The aim is to cover the entire value chain from silicon production to solar module manufacturing without generating any carbon emissions.

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Combining “Tinkertoy” Materials with Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells May Increase Photovoltaic Efficiency

Sandia National Laboratories

Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, Calif., have received a $1.2 million award from the US Department of Energy’s SunShot Initiative to develop a technique that they believe will significantly improve the efficiencies of photovoltaic materials and help make solar electricity cost-competitive with other sources of energy. The technique builds on the laboratory’s recent work combining metal-organic framework (MOF) materials with dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC).

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Nano Focus: Electrolyte-free electrochromic device fabricated using graphene quantum dot-viologen nanocomposites

Materials Research Society/MRS Bulletin (Sesuraj)_220

The uniqueness of electrochromic materials lies in their ability to undergo a reversible change in optical properties with applied voltage. These electro-optical properties can be used to fabricate novel, technologically advanced electrochromic devices (ECDs) ranging from e-paper to smart windows to display panels. Conventional ECDs require the use of an electrolyte to support electrochromic reactions. E. Hwang, H. (Hanleem) Lee, and their colleagues from Sungkyunkwan University, South Korea, have now introduced an electrolyte-free ECD that functions using graphene quantum dot-viologen nanocomposites.

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Inorganic-Organic Phosphors May Lead to Rare-Earth-Free LEDs

Materials Research SocietyREE Free LEDs 220

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society points toward a possible alternative to LEDs that use rare-earth metals: inorganic-organic hybrid phosphors that are free of any rare-earth metals that can be used to create an array of colors.

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Marvin L. Cohen to Receive the Materials Research Society's Highest Honor

Materials Research SocietyMarvin Cohen 220

The 2014 Von Hippel Award, the Materials Research Society’s highest honor, will be presented to Marvin L. Cohen, University Professor of Physics at the University of California, Berkeley (UC–Berkeley) and senior scientist in the Materials Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Cohen is being recognized for “explaining and predicting properties of materials and for successfully predicting new materials using microscopic quantum theory.” Cohen will accept the honor during the Awards Ceremony of the 2014 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston on Wednesday, December 3, at 6:30 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom of the Sheraton Boston Hotel. There, he will also present his award lecture, Explaining and Predicting the Properties of Materials Using Quantum Theory.

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Marvin L. Cohen to Receive Materials Research Society's Highest Honor

Materials Research SocietyMarvin Cohen 220

The 2014 Von Hippel Award, the Materials Research Society’s highest honor, will be presented to Marvin L. Cohen, University Professor of Physics at the University of California, Berkeley (UC–Berkeley) and senior scientist in the Materials Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Cohen is being recognized for “explaining and predicting properties of materials and for successfully predicting new materials using microscopic quantum theory.” Cohen will accept the honor during the Awards Ceremony of the 2014 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston on Wednesday, December 3, at 6:30 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom of the Sheraton Boston Hotel. There, he will also present his award lecture, Explaining and Predicting the Properties of Materials Using Quantum Theory.

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Bottom-up method enables high-quality graphene-oxide interface

Materials Research SocietyFigure1 MRS 220

An alternative and novel method of producing graphene-oxide interface for emerging nanoelectronics has been reported in a recent issue of the journal Nature Communications by an international research team led by Alessandro Baraldi who has joint appointments at the University of Trieste, Elettra-Sincrotrone, and IOM-CNR, Italy. The researchers used Ni3Al as a substrate on which they grew graphene by CVD. The researchers then oxidized the substrate so that an alumina nanosheet, 1.5-nm thick, formed beneath the graphene.

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Chair of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to Resign on January 1

American Institute of PhysicsAllison macfarlane 220

Allison Macfarlane, Chair of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, announced yesterday that she will resign from her position on January 1, 2015. Macfarlane will become the Director of George Washington University’s Center for International Science and Technology Policy.

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National Synchrotron Light Source II Achieves “First Light”

Brookhaven National Laboratorysynchrotron xrays 220

The brightest synchrotron light source in the world has delivered its first x-ray beams. The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory achieved “first light” on October 23, 2014, when operators opened the shutter to begin commissioning the first experimental station, allowing x-rays to travel to a phosphor detector and capture the facility’s first photons. While considerable work remains to realize the full potential of the new facility, first light counts as an important step on the road to facility commissioning.

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