2018 MRS Spring Meeting

Call for Papers

Accepting New Late Breaking Abstracts
December 1, 2017—January 11, 2018 (11:59 pm ET)


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Symposium EN18—Multiscale Designing and Constructing Photocatalytic Materials for Solar Fuels

Photocatalysis that can convert abundant but intermittent solar energy into storable chemical energy represents an amazing technique route to produce energy for a sustainable modern society. Splitting water to release hydrogen and reducing carbon dioxide in the presence of water to produce hydrocarbons with solar-driven photocatalysts/photoelectrodes are two highly concerned yet very challenging reactions. Designing and constructing photocatalytic materials at multi-scales will play a pivotal role in fully steering three basic processes (light absorption, separation of photogenerated charge carriers in bulk, and their transfer on surface) of photocatalysis facing these two reactions. No doubt, numerous experimental and theoretical progresses in understanding and modulating photocatalytic materials achieved at different scales from atomic to nanometer levels has greatly promoted solar-driven photocatalysis. More importantly, these progresses have established a strong basis for making the new breakthroughs that will require researchers investigating photocatalytic materials at different scales to put their ideas and understandings together. This symposium will encourage an integration toward the construction of highly efficient photocatalytic materials at multi-scales and will provide a medium for both experimentally and theoretically based discussions of photocatalytic materials.

Topics will include:

  • Controlling heteroatoms/defects of photocatalysts
  • Faceted photocatalysts with unusual properties
  • 2D photocatalysts
  • Surface/interface modulations of photocatalysts
  • Heterostructured photocatalysts with promoted charge separation
  • Efficient photoelectrodes for water splitting and CO2 reduction
  • Designing and controlling co-catalysts for water oxidation and reduction
  • Advanced experimental characterization techniques for photocatalysts
  • Theoretical investigations on light absorption, separation and transfer of charge carriers in photocatalysts

Invited Speakers:

  • Uri Banin (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel)
  • Zhenfeng Bian (Shanghai Normal University, China)
  • Jinlong Gong (Tianjin University, China)
  • Sang Woo Han (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Republic of Korea)
  • Hicham H Idriss (SABIC-CRI, Saudi Arabia)
  • Ho Won Jang (Seoul National University, Republic of Korea)
  • Li Ji (The University of Texas, USA)
  • Prashant Kamat (University of Notre Dame, USA)
  • Moritz Kuehnel (University of Cambridge, United Kingdom)
  • Can Li (Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, CAS, China)
  • Zetian Mi (McGill University, Canada)
  • Frank E Osterloh (University of California, Davis, USA)
  • Hynd Remita (The University of Paris, France)
  • Peter Robertson (Queens University, United Kingdom)
  • Patrik Schmuki (Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany)
  • Jason Scott (University of New South Wales, Australia)
  • Annabella Selloni (Princeton University, USA)
  • Zaicheng Sun (Beijing University of Technology, China)
  • Hiroaki Tada (Kindai University, Japan)
  • Lydia Helena Wong (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)
  • Xiaoxiang Xu (Tongji University, China)
  • Gengfeng Zheng (Fudan University, China)
  • Yongfa Zhu (Tsinghua University, China)
  • Jijun Zou (Tianjin University, China)
  • Zhigang Zou (Nanjing University, China)

Symposium Organizers

Gang Liu
Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences
China
86-24-23971088, gangliu@imr.ac.cn

Xiaobo Chen
University of Missouri-Kansas City
USA
816-235-6420, chenxiaobo@umkc.edu

John TS Irvine
University of St Andrews
United Kingdom
44-1334-463817, jtsi@st-andrews.ac.uk

Lianzhou Wang
University of Queensland
Australia
61-7-33654218, l.wang@uq.edu.au

Keywords for Abstract Submission

CO2 reduction, microstrucutre, photocatalysts, photoelectrochemical, solar fuels, theoretical prediction, water splitting