Meetings & Events

 

2015 MRS Fall Meeting Logo2015 MRS Fall Meeting & Exhibit

November 29-December 4, 2015 | Boston
Meeting Chairs: T. John Balk, Ram Devanathan, George G. Malliaras, Larry A. Nagahara, Luisa Torsi

Symposium B—Stretchable and Active Polymers and Composites for Electronics and Medicine

Soft electronic systems based on polymers and composites are expected to have important applications that range from conformable biomedical devices to mechanically robust and portable systems for energy conversion and storage. The fundamental challenge of the field is the co-engineering of softness, responsiveness, and electrical properties in a single material or system of materials. This symposium will highlight several successful and nascent approaches to this challenge. These approaches include nanostructured composites (e.g., semiconducting or conducting particles dispersed in a polymeric matrix), deterministic composites (i.e., those based on patterned films on elastomeric substrates), and intrinsically stretchable organic conductors and semiconductors (i.e., conjugated polymers whose molecular structure or solid microstructure permits substantial deformation). The topics of this symposium will span the synthesis, fabrication, characterization, modeling, and application of this class of soft and functional polymers and composites. This symposium will provide a forum for a discussion of the fundamental aspects of the chemistry of materials, the physics of solids and soft matter, and the fabrication of devices for highly impactful technologies. The anticipated scope of these technologies will be very broad, which may range from healthcare to clean energy.

Topics will include:

  • Mechanical properties
  • Thin-film mechanics
  • Fracture mechanics
  • Wearable sensors
  • Compliant energy sources
  • Self-healing systems
  • Biodegradable systems
  • Edible electronics
  • Intrinsically stretchable electronics
  • Synthetic approaches
  • Materials characterization
  • Fabrication engineering

Invited Speakers:

  • Zhenan Bao (Stanford University, USA)
  • Siegfried Bauer (Johannes Kepler University, Austria)
  • Wolfgang Binder (Martin Luther University, Germany)
  • Reinhold Dauskardt (Stanford University, USA)
  • Michael Dickey (North Carolina State University, USA)
  • Nathan Gianneschi (University California, San Diego, USA)
  • Young-Chang Joo (Seoul National University, Republic of Korea)
  • Ali Khademhosseini (Massachusetts Institute Technology, USA)
  • Dae-Hyeong Kim (Seoul National University, Republic of Korea)
  • Stephanie Lacour (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Krystelle Lionti (IBM Almaden, USA)
  • Brendan O'Connor (North Carolina State University, USA)
  • Qibing Pei (University California, Los Angeles, USA)
  • John Rogers (University Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA)
  • Takao Someya (UniversityTokyo, Japan)
  • Zhigang Suo (Harvard University, USA)
  • Rafael Verduzco (Rice University, USA)
  • Ajay Virkar (c3nano, USA)
  • Sigurd Wagner (Princeton University, USA)
  • George Whitesides (Harvard University, USA)
  • Guihua Yu (University Texas at Austin, USA)
  • Xuanhe Zhao (Duke University, USA)

Symposium Organizers

Darren Lipomi
University of California, San Diego
NanoEngineering
USA
858-246-1227, dlipomi@eng.ucsd.edu

Christopher Bettinger
Carnegie Mellon University
Materials Science and Engineering
USA

Chul-Hong Kim
LG Display Co., Ltd.
Republic of Korea

Nanshu Lu
University of Texas at Austin
Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
USA
512-471-4208, nanshulu@utexas.edu