Meetings & Events

 

2015 MRS Fall Meeting Logo2015 MRS Fall Meeting & Exhibit

November 29-December 4, 2015 | Boston
Meeting Chairs: T. John Balk, Ram Devanathan, George G. Malliaras, Larry A. Nagahara, Luisa Torsi

Symposium QQ—Catalytic Materials for Energy

Transformative ways to increase efficiency, sustainability, and diversity in energy production, conversion and storage are needed to meet growing demand in energy and to reduce our society’s carbon footprint. Catalytic materials will play a key role here by facilitating desirable chemical transformations. Bringing the materials science perspective into catalyst discovery provides many opportunities in synthesis, characterization, and use of novel materials in energy applications. However, many of the current applications rely heavily on the use of precious metals, an approach which cannot be sustainable in long terms. Also, novel applications as the catalytic conversion of biomass in aqueous media require new, perhaps non-oxide, hydrothermally stable catalyst supports. To make a sizable contribution to addressing the society’s energy related issues, materials strategies to reduce the cost by employing more abundant elements as well as improved stability, are highly desirable. Just to name two examples: an energy and materials cost efficient conversion of abundant natural gas could significantly contribute to the production of synthetic fuels and a broad spectrum of chemicals in nearest terms; a highly efficient artificial photosynthesis of fuels via water splitting and CO2 reduction can be the holy grail of clean energy, but the challenge is to achieve high enough solar-energy conversion efficiency. All these applications, from catalysis to electro- to photocatalysis to storage in batteries have one common: design and development of new classes of materials. Advances in materials synthesis, atomic level characterization and theoretical/computational methods (and interconnecting these components) are poised to accelerate the discovery of novel materials for use as catalysts in energy applications. This symposium is aimed at bringing together researchers in materials science, synthesis, heterogeneous catalysis, electrocatalysis, and photocatalysis to highlight recent progresses and discuss challenges and opportunities in the materials aspect of catalysis research for energy applications.

Topics will include:

  • Sunlight to fuels via photocatalytic materials
  • Catalysis by materials with well-defined structures
  • Characterization of materials for catalysis in energy
  • Theory and modeling of materials for catalysis in energy
  • Materials for catalytic production of fuels and chemicals
  • Metals, alloys, and non-precious-metal materials for electrocatalysis
  • Synthesis in control of morphology, size, shape, interface, and pore structure

Invited Speakers:

  • Jeroen van Bokhoven (ETH Zürich and The Swiss Light Source, Switzerland)
  • Angelika Brückner (Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse - LIKAT, Rostock, Germany)
  • Emily Carter (Princeton University, USA)
  • Jonah Erlebacher (Johns Hopkins University, USA)
  • Heinz Frei (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA)
  • Kerrie Gath (Ford Motor Company, USA)
  • Song Jin (University of Wisconsin Madison, USA)
  • Roel van de Krol (Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Germany)
  • Matthew Neurock (University of Minnesota, USA)
  • Marcello Rigutto (Shell International, Netherlands)
  • Wilson Smith (TU Delft, Netherlands)
  • Vojislav Stamenkovic (Argonne National Laboratory, USA)
  • Shouheng Sun (Brown University, USA)
  • Oomman Varghese (University of Houston, USA)
  • Heli Wang (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA)
  • Randall Winans (Argonne National Laboratory, USA)
  • Feng-Shou Xiao (Zhejiang University, China)
  • Francisco Zaera (University of California, Riverside, USA)

Symposium Organizers

Stefan Vajda
Argonne National Laboratory
Materials Science Division and Nanoscience and Technology Division
USA
630-252-8123, vajda@anl.gov

De-en Jiang
University of California, Riverside
USA
951-827-4430, de-en.jiang@ucr.edu

Carl Mesters
Shell Projects and Technology, Shell Technology Center Houston
USA

Dunwei Wang
Boston College
USA
617-552-3121, dunwei.wang@bc.edu