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Tutorial EP08—Ultra-Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors—From Materials to Devices

Nov 25, 2018
01:30 PM - 05:00 PM
Hynes, Level 2, Room 209

The Ultra-Wide-Bandgap (UWBG) materials represent the next chapter in the history of semiconductor physics, with potential applications to optoelectronics, radio-frequency electronics, power switching electronics, electronics and sensors for harsh environments, platforms for quantum information processing and possibly as-yet-unforeseen areas. Such applications are enabled by the properties of the materials and the novel device structures enabled by those properties. The first part of this tutorial will focus on the unique physical properties of the key UWBG semiconductors (AlN, BN, Ga2O3, diamond, etc.) as well as the challenges in their growth and manipulation (substrates, doping, defects, etc.) The second part will focus on potential applications and the device structures appropriate for those applications (LEDs, vertical and lateral transistors, etc.) as well as the challenges associated with the design and processing of such devices (metal-semiconductor contacts, surface passivation, etc.) The goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the key aspects of this new and exciting field.

1:30 pm
Ultra-Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors: Materials

Robert J. Nemanich

The first part of the tutorial will focus on the unique physical properties of the key UWBG semiconductors (AlN, BN, Ga2O3, diamond, etc.) as well as the challenges in their growth and manipulation (substrates, doping, defects, etc.).

3:00 pm BREAK

3:30 pm
Ultra-Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors: Devices

Robert J. Kaplar

The second part of the tutorial will focus on potential applications of UWBG semiconductors, and the device structures appropriate for those applications (LEDs, vertical and lateral transistors, etc.) as well as the challenges associated with the design and processing of such devices (metal-semiconductor contacts, surface passivation, etc.).

Instructors

  • Robert J. Nemanich, Arizona State University
  • Robert J. Kaplar, Sandia National Laboratories