Meetings & Events

1998 MRS Fall Meeting & Exhibit

November 30 - December 4, 1998 | Boston
Meeting Chairs:
 Clyde L. Briant, Eric H. Chason, Howard E. Katz, Yuh Shiohara

Symposium X—Frontiers of Materials Research Authoritative Reviews for Nonspecialists

-MRS-

Chairs

Clyde Briant, Brown Univ
Eric Chason, Brown Univ
Howard Katz, Bell Laboratories-Lucent Technologies
Yuh Shiohara, ISTEC

* Invited paper

SESSION X1: 
Chairs: Clyde L. Briant, Eric H. Chason, Howard E. Katz and Yuh Shiohara 
Tuesday Afternoon, December 1, 1998 
Salon E (M)
12:05 PM *X1.1 
CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR MATERIALS SCIENCE IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY. Christine Sloane , General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI. 

Abstract Not Available 

12:45 PM *X1.2 
SILICON MICROMECHANICS FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. David Bishop , Lucent Technologies, Bell Labs Innovations, Murray Hill, NJ. 

Abstract Not Available 

SESSION X2: 
Chairs: Clyde L. Briant, Eric H. Chason, Howard E. Katz and Yuh Shiohara 
Wednesday Afternoon, December 2, 1998 
Salon E (M)
12:15 PM *X2.1 
DAVID TURNBULL AWARD LECTURE
UNSOLVED MYSTERIES OF WATER IN ITS LIQUID AND GLASS PHASES. H. Eugene Stanley , Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA. 

Water has a well-studied critical point C with coordinates , where (to one significant figure) K is the critical temperature, MPa is the critical pressure, and  g/cm3 is the critical density. Near the critical point, water behaves not unlike many fluids, but when the temperature is lowered below about 50oC, water becomes exceedingly strange--and even more strange as one considers supercooled water and its two glassy phases. 
We will discuss the recent hypothesis that the anomalies of liquid and glassy water may be connected to the existence of a ``second'' critical point C' with coordinates , where (also to one significant figure) K, MPa, and 1 g/cm3 [1]. The low­ density and high-density liquid phases that exist below C' are the analogs of recently-discovered low-density and high-density phases of glassy solid water. We will describe very recent work elucidating the connection between the liquid and solid amorphous phases. We will focus on relevant experimental work, including very recent work that tests the hypothesis by probing the region between the stable liquid and the glass [2]. 
It is possible that there are other materials for which second critical points exist, so understanding one such material, water, may help in understanding a number of materials.

SESSION X3: 
Chairs: Clyde L. Briant, Eric H. Chason, Howard E. Katz and Yuh Shiohara 
Thursday Afternoon, December 3, 1998 
Salon E (M)

12:05 PM *X3.1 
PERSPECTIVES FROM THE OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY'S DIVISION OF SCIENCE. Arthur Bienenstock , Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President. 

Abstract Not Available 

12:45 PM X3.2 
LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY INDUSTRIAL PARTNERING EXPERIENCES. Jeffrey Wadsworth , Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA. 

Abstract Not Available